Equipment Roundup: 2019 Silverado gets new towing features; Demo attachment roundup; Pete 567 Test Drive; JCB intros ‘Hi-Viz’ skid steers, CTLs; Knikmops KM100 is a lighter, cheaper skid steer alternative

Updated Aug 14, 2018

Knikmops Intrepid KM100 compact loaders are lighter, faster, less expensive alternative to skid steers

The Texas based importer and distributor Miniloaders.com (formerly Compactgiant) has begun distribution of a new, articulated-steering mini-loader from Belgian manufacturer Knikmops.

The Knikmops KM100 Intrepid series will come in two flavors: the standard boom Intrepid KM100 and the Intrepid KM100 Tele, which comes with a telescoping boom. Bucket capacities range from 0.2 to 0.5 cubic yards depending on type. The standard boom reaches to 80 inches; the telescoping version goes up to 108 inches or 9 feet. These machines weigh 2,300 pounds, run on 25 horsepower Kubota engines, Poclain wheel motors and Bosch Rexroth hydraulics. Both models feature universal attachment plates with manual locking. Top travel speed is 11 mph.

 

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JCB intros ‘Hi-Viz’ Powerboom skid steer, CTL models with lower-mounted boom

JCB has launched a new lineup of skid-steer and compact track loaders that prioritize visibility with a modified boom design.

The new “Hi-Viz” large platform compact loader lineup includes four skid steers and three CTLs:

Skid steer models:

  • 250 (formerly the 225)
  • 270 (formerly the 260)
  • 300
  • 330

CTL models:

  • 250T (formerly the 225T
  • 270T (formerly the 260T)
  • 300T
  • 330T

Test Drive: Peterbilt Model 567’s consistent power, versatility and comfort have made it a very popular work truck

Peterbilt last year seized a record 20 percent of the vocational market – a gain driven largely by its Model 567.

The work truck staple of Peterbilt’s order book for the last five model years, the 567 was designed with excellent forward visibility and aerodynamic enhancements.

The concept of an aerodynamic advantage while grossed out with aggregate sounds like a misnomer, but the trade cycle for a vocational truck is more than twice the five-plus year first-service-life of many long-haul trucks. Over the course of a decade, even limited on-highway miles add up.

 

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Attachment Roundup: Break, crush, grab with these 10 add-ons for demolition work

Hyundai Construction Equipment offers 15 models of hydraulic breakers in its HDB series to fit everything from the company’s compact excavators to its 100-ton class machines. Hyundai’s excavator linkage matches the attachments’ mounting brackets. The breakers can also be fitted to other brand excavators by Hyundai dealers with custom mounting brackets. The breakers feature large diameter chisels and tie-bolts to increase strength and durability, a hose adapter that prevents breaks and leaks, and auto-greasing to protect moving parts.

Epiroc has added the Intelligent Protection System to automate its heavy hydraulic breakers. The system’s AutoControl automatically adjusts piston length to the task. When the attachment breaks through material, the AutoStop function automatically shuts off the breaker to prevent blank firing. The system requires no operator intervention, the company says. It is available on Epiroc HB 2000, HB 2500, HB 3100, HB 3600, HB 4100 and HB 4700 breakers and will be added to the company’s other heavy hydraulic breakers this year.

 

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Chevy wants to make towing easier with 2019 Silverado 1500’s new tech, cameras, apps

While researching ways to improve its flagship pickup for the 2019 model year, Chevrolet says one of the major themes from its conversations with thousands of customers was how towing capability was a major piece to their purchasing decision.

In many cases that sentiment was followed by another from these customers: trailering is hard.

So, in an effort to address this feedback Chevy has packed the2019 Silverado 1500 with loads of new technology and other features focused on the towing experience.

 

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