Product Focus: Telescopic handlers

Pettibone celebrates 125th year with new axle technology
Answering industry-wide concerns over tire wear, Pettibone has introduced the Precision Steer system on its 6,000-, 8,000- and 10,000-pound telehandlers. Axle manufacturer Carraro collaborated with Pettibone to produce the Carraro 26.43 axle, which the company says improves steering geometry by 50 percent, along with tire wear by another 50 percent. The axle addresses the need for the company’s telehandlers to have a high turning angle in tight jobsites, and preserves the tight turning radius without compromising wheel alignment. The axle will be standard in all Pettibone telehandlers.


Shift on the fly with hydrostatic ground drive
The Bobcat VersaHandler V518 comes with an 18-foot lift height and 5,500-pound lifting capacity. Powered by a turbo-charged 105-horsepower diesel engine, the machine has a heavy-duty hydrostatic ground drive for shifting on the fly between high and low speed ranges. It has dynamic braking, allowing controlled movement – such as inching up or down slopes – on the jobsite. It features three steering modes: all-wheel steer for tight turning, front-wheel steer for road travel and crab steer for positioning loads from side to side.


JLG showcases new compact telehandler line
JLG Industries’ compact telehandlers include the Model G5-19A with a maximum capacity of 5,000 pounds, and the Model G6-23-A, with a 6,600-pound capacity. The G5-19A has a lift height up to 19 feet and a forward reach of 10 feet 4 inches. The machine offers improved operator vision and 140-degree carriage rotation. A mechanical quick switch enables fast changes from forks to other attachments. The unit, if powered by a 100-horsepower Deutz diesel engine coupled with four-wheel drive, provides 45 percent gradability.


Load, dig, grade as well as handle materials
The VR-518 from Ingersoll Rand has a maximum lift height of 18 feet 2 inches and a maximum capacity of 5,500 pounds. With standard tires, the unit reaches forward a maximum of 10 feet 8 inches from the front of the tires. It has a two-section boom design with high-rotation carriage and offers 7,300 pounds of breakout force for digging. The low boom mount of the machine allows right-side visibility, and a high mounted, fully enclosed cab gives visibility to all sides of the machine.


New tilt cylinder increases productivity
The 642 and 844 telescopic handlers by Mustang Manufacturing offer pilot-operated joystick controls, a new tilt cylinder and an optional work platform system. One joystick controls the boom, the other the units’ frame leveling and attachments. The tilt cylinder affects how quickly the forks can be tilted and allows for increased productivity from the previous 638 model, which was replaced by the 642. The work platform system lets you safely use a personnel platform attached to the forks. Once the system is activated, it neutralizes the transmission, applies the parking brake, disables the fork tilt and auxiliary hydraulic circuits and restricts the use of the frame leveling circuit.


Auxiliary hydraulics increase versatility
The SkyTrak 8042 telehandler from JLG Industries has a rated capacity of 8,000 pounds and 6,000-pound capacity at its maximum lift height of 41 feet 11 inches. It has auxiliary hydraulics for a variety of attachments, including earth augers, side tilt and swing carriages, and buckets. Two sizes of truss booms in 10-foot and 15-foot lengths are also available with ratings up to 2,000 pounds.


Four-section boom for extended reach and height
Caterpillar’s TH580B telehandler has a four-section boom that allows the machine to lift loads as high as 56 feet and to reach forward 42 feet. The machine has an operating weight of 27,465 pounds and a rated load capacity of 11,000 pounds. It features three steering modes: two wheel, crab and circle steer. Stabilizers offer plus or minus 5-degree leveling.


Remote control raises, lowers, extends and retracts boom
Manitou now has a remote control option for its MT 6642 and MT 8044 telescopic handlers. In addition to raising, lowering, extending and retracting the boom, the wireless hand-held transmitter can start and stop the engine. The transmitter is waterproof and includes a proportional trigger for controlling the speed of the boom. Each transmitter uses a programmable, unique identification code ensuring no two systems will conflict on a jobsite.


360-degree visibility, robust chassis give productivity benefits
Xtreme Manufacturing, in a strategic relationship with the Italian firm Dieci, offers a nine-model lineup of telehandlers, ranging from the XRM519, a 19-foot, 5,000-pound machine to the XRM1254, a 54-foot, 12,000-pound machine. Standard features include a Perkins turbocharged diesel engine, 360-degree visibility, robust chassis, foam-filled tires, deluxe suspension seat and fulltime planetary four-wheel drive.


Machine takes on material handling jobs with ease
John Deere’s 3020 Series comes with a four-speed Powr-Sync transmission and a PowerTech engine rated at 114 horsepower. The two models in the lineup, the 3220 and 3420, feature a left-hand reverser mounted near the steering wheel. An optional PowerShift transmission offers fingertip shift control for ease of gear selection. The units have a 34-gallons-per-minute, variable-displacement piston pump, allowing smooth extension and retraction of the arm even when other hydraulic functions are operating.


European styling, low boom mount on telehandler duo
The TH60 and TH80 telehandlers from MEC have a maximum reach height of 41.5 feet. A low boom mount increases visibility, and maneuverability is enhanced by the choice of three steering modes: front-only, four wheel and crab. The rear axle lock engages when lifting a load above 40 degrees, but remains free when going over rough terrain. Chassis leveling allows operators to feather the load.


10,000 pounds of rated capacity
The Gradall Model 544D telehandler from JLG Industries has a 10,000-pound rated lift capacity and a 5,000-pound capacity at its 55-foot maximum lift height with stabilizers deployed. The unit’s 90-degree, rear-pivot steering provides maneuverability on crowded jobsites. The machine pivots around tight corners, keeping the forks and load inside the turning radius at all times. The machine is powered by a 125-horsepower John Deere engine. The no-shift hydrostatic drivetrain and a high-bias, limited-slip front axle provide smooth operation at all speeds. One option is a swing carriage that rotates 90 degrees left or right to make load placements in tight areas to the side of the boom. The machine also has 60-inch pallet forks for holding greater volumes of material.