McLaughlin introduces Vision lineup of underground utility locators

Me Photo
Updated Jun 7, 2017
The Vision FLX2 underground utility locator is designed for power companies and secondary power contractors. It is one of three new locators unveiled by McLaughlin at ConExpo.The Vision FLX2 underground utility locator is designed for power companies and secondary power contractors. It is one of three new locators unveiled by McLaughlin at ConExpo.

The new Vision utility locator lineup from McLaughlin is designed for a variety of users, from utility contractors to power companies to professional locators.

McLaughlin says it made the Vision LX more user-friendly for utility contractors, combining the peak-locating screen and null-locating screen into one display. The display also has an automatic depth and current-measurement index that automatically appears when the locator is positioned over a utility line. The display’s compass automatically calculates the peak signal and indicates the direction of the utility path.

The Vision FLX2 is designed for power companies and secondary power contractors. It differs from the LX by adding secondary and sheaths fault-finding capabilities. The operator uses an A-frame transmitter after connecting the FLX2 to a power or telecommunications line to find the fault in the line within a few inches. The device has five active frequency modes, allowing the operator to adjust to conditions.

The GX2 is McLaughlin’s most powerful in the Vision the lineup, designed for professional locators. It has a 7-watt transmitter instead of the standard 5-watt transmitter on the other devices. That helps with long fiber runs or gas distribution projects with tracing wires. It has a dual frequency mode that does not require Bluetooth and sends 9.5-kilohertz and 38-kilohertz signals at the same time into the line. The company says that when the 38kHz signal fades, the operator can shift to the 9.5-kHz signal to continue locating. Contractors can also program in other frequencies.

All three Vision locators come with a semiautomatic gain function for operating in congested areas and a manual gain function in rural locales. The locators simultaneously take readings from three antennas and average the measurements for improved accuracy. And a waterproof inductive clamp can be used so the device can lay on or partially grip a utility.