$6.4B Headed to States to Cut Carbon, Including for Road Pavements

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low-carbon asphalt pavement part of FHWA $6.4 billion carbon reduction plan.
Low-carbon asphalt pavement part of FHWA $6.4 billion carbon reduction plan.
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The Federal Highway Administration has announced $6.4 billion heading to states over five years to help reduce carbon emissions through infrastructure projects, including use of low-carbon pavement technologies, according to the National Asphalt Pavement Association.

The new Carbon Reduction Program, which is part of the $1 trillion infrastructure law, includes funding for such projects as electric-vehicle charging stations, building public transportation corridors and creating walking and biking trails.

The program’s guidance also includes low-carbon asphalt pavements, NAPA says.

Low-carbon highway pavement projects would be eligible if a lifecycle assessment demonstrates that the low-carbon pavement would lead to significant reductions on carbon-dioxide emissions when compared to typical pavement practices, according to NAPA. The lifecycle assessment can be calculated by using FHWA’s LCA Pave Tool that can determine the carbon-dioxide impacts of pavement material and design decisions.

NAPA says the CRB guidance is not a mandate, “but a free-market approach to utilize ready-to-go pavement technologies that reduce carbon emissions.”

“As the sector generating the most carbon emissions in the U.S. economy, transportation must play a leading role in solving the climate crisis,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg. “The Carbon Reduction Program will help reduce pollution from transportation and move us closer to the President’s ambitious goal of cutting emissions in half by 2030.”

“This new program provides states and local agencies in both urban and rural areas the flexibility and funding needed to reduce emissions and build a more sustainable transportation network that will benefit all travelers,” says Deputy Federal Highway Administrator Stephanie Pollack. “The Bipartisan Infrastructure Law makes transformative investments in our nation’s transportation infrastructure, and this is one of the key programs that will help address the climate crisis.”

The funding would be spread out from 2022 to 2026.

Here’s a breakdown from the FHWA on how much each state would receive over five years:

State

Estimated 5-Year Total

Alabama

128,343,911

Alaska

81,878,583

Arizona

117,325,887

Arkansas

86,993,865

California

555,295,299

Colorado

85,983,748

Connecticut

79,181,352

Delaware

27,098,325

Dist. of Col.

25,674,472

Florida

320,386,861

Georgia

210,930,745

Hawaii

27,289,225

Idaho

47,067,526

Illinois

225,633,212

Indiana

156,185,245

Iowa

82,572,650

Kansas

63,297,324

Kentucky

111,888,685

Louisiana

118,344,665

Maine

29,941,837

Maryland

94,377,768

Massachusetts

93,705,892

Michigan

168,587,505

Minnesota

106,713,242

Mississippi

81,289,039

Missouri

158,551,878

Montana

68,117,913

Nebraska

47,947,499

Nevada

57,169,952

New Hampshire

26,647,302

New Jersey

154,483,918

New Mexico

61,245,402

New York

257,806,980

North Carolina

170,984,555

North Dakota

40,894,061

Ohio

214,687,250

Oklahoma

106,962,692

Oregon

82,547,230

Pennsylvania

264,847,619

Rhode Island

35,787,935

South Carolina

112,761,276

South Dakota

46,430,937

Tennessee

139,172,276

Texas

641,277,338

Utah

57,300,524

Vermont

32,831,293

Virginia

165,786,199

Washington

109,987,472

West Virginia

72,814,410

Wisconsin

124,681,249

Wyoming

42,287,975

Total

6,419,999,998