Terex announces first T4i-compliant PT-110G compact track loaders

|  October 19, 2012 |

Terex today announced its latest compact track loaders, the PT-110G and PT-110G Forestry. The new CTLs are Terex’s first compact Tier 4 Interim-compliant machines and are powered by 4-cylinder turbo-powered Perkins engines.

The PT-110G CTLs have a profile of only 6 feet and weigh between 11,000 and 12,100 pounds, managing a ground pressure of 4.3 pounds per square inch. The 110 horsepower of the PT-110G and the 111 horsepower of the PT-110G Forestry are the highest levels in the Terex CTL lineup yet. That boost in horsepower helps in powering these machines up to 10 miles per hour through less-than-ideal surface conditions thanks to 332 foot pounds of peak torque.

The PT-110G is situated in the beefier category of CTLs with an operating capacity of 3,800 pounds at 50 percent tipping load capacity. However, this model does see a bit of a decrease in capability from the PT-100G which boasted an operating capacity of 4,000 pounds, according to the Equipment World 2012-2013 Spec Guide.

Lift height is much improved over the PT-100G as the PT-110G’s 125 inches of lift height are an increase of 8.5 inches and place it in an above average group of CTLs. Meanwhile, the 111-horsepower PT-110G Forestry packs a bigger punch with a 4,300-pound operating capacity (a 300 pound increase over the PT-100G Forestry) at 50% tipping load capacity with the same 125-inch lift height.

Terex also points out other features including “quick-connect” hydraulic fittings, a tilt-out radiator, joystick controls, easy maintenance access and a hydraulic reversing fan that allows operators to set intervals in order maintain cooling system performance while the machine tackles heavy applications.

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