JCB launches Teleskid at ConExpo: SSL/Telehandler hybrid’s benefits extend further than its long reach (PHOTOS, VIDEO)
Marcia Gruver Doyle | March 10, 2017

Photo credit: JCB

One machine generating a significant amount of buzz on the ConExpo 2017 show floor is JCB’s Teleskid, after the company did a series of teaser videos before the show. The half telescopic handler/half skid steer (it also comes in a compact track loader version) is what Randy Tinley with JCB calls “a natural progression from our unique side door/single-side boom set up on skid steers and CTLs.”

The Teleskid can reach 60 percent further forward than a typical skid steer—up to 13 feet 3 inches—and is the only skid steer that can dig below its chassis to a depth of 3 feet, JCB says.

A forward reach of 8 feet gives the machine the ability to reach through and over obstacles. The machine comes in two versions: the 3TS-8W wheeled model and the 3TS-8T tracked version. “It can sit on the top of a hill and mow down to a pond and the operator never has to move the machine,” Tinley says.

At 50 percent of tipping load, the skid steer is rated at a capacity of 3,208 pounds with the boom retracted and 1,347 pounds with the boom extended. At 35 percent of tipping load, the CTL capacity is rated at 3,695 pounds with the boom retracted and 1,614 pounds with the boom extended.

The Teleskid boom takes its pedigree from the company’s Loadall telescopic handler, although there are differences. “The boom looks similar, but its smaller than the Loadall boom, and uses a skid steer coupler, which opens it up to any skid steer or CTL attachment,” Tinley says.

The boom is mounted on a single-piece fully welded chassis, and has a single piece u-pressed design. Centralized lift and extension rams evenly distribute load stresses.

The Teleskids have both vertical and radial lift, zero turning radius and a 24 gpm standard flow option, allowing you to operate attachments when fully extended. They are powered by a 74-horspower JCB EcoMAX engine.

Both the 3TS-8W (foreground) and 3TS-8T (background) were on display at ConExpo 2017. Photo credit: Wayne Grayson

The machines are in dealer inventories now and Tinley says several units have been sold, both to a landscaper and to two disaster response teams.

“The landscaper does a variety of work, including concrete, sod, silt fencing and site prep,” he says. And on the disaster response side? “One contractor saw a field test unit working after a hurricane, and immediately investigated it. He liked how he could remove debris from the top of a pile, instead of from the bottom, as he would with a skid steer. He bought one of our first production machines. Another disaster contractor saw his unit, and also bought a machine.”

Photo credit: Wayne Grayson

 

Photo credit: Wayne Grayson

 

Photo credit: JCB

 

Photo credit: JCB

 

Photo credit: Wayne Grayson

 

Photo credit: JCB

 

Photo credit: JCB

 

Photo credit: JCB

 

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