GEAR: 1928 Ford Model A pickup with BMW V-8 is a throwback to the early days of hot-rodding

|  June 07, 2013 |

Ford Model A hot rod with BMW V-8 Ford Model A hot rod rear Ford Model A hot rod rear 2Click on over to Mike Burroughs telling of his latest hot rod creation and after just a few seconds of reading you’re firmly aware that this is a man who appreciates the art of the automobile. Burroughs is the editor-in-chief of the custom auto website StanceWorks and a guy who pays attention to the aesthetics, who loves the lines and curves, the beauty a car or truck adds to the world around you.

And out of the desire to build “a vehicle that would push me as a person,” Burroughs has created a hot rod that, instead of boasting bright flames or a pristine neon paint job and chrome, has a look that embraces dirt and rust and exudes an attitude that is a throwback to the early spirit of hot-rodding.

The body is that of a 1928 Ford Model A pickup. The Model was Ford’s second major success after the original Model T. Burroughs bought the body for $2,200 on Craigslist. “It seemed too good to be true —the old and tattered body sat on top of the original frame with a complete driveline,” Burroughs writes. “The original 3.3-liter inline 4-cylinder was in place, as well as the 3-speed manual gearbox and the mechanical brakes and linkages.”

But Burroughs stripped out that old 4-cylinder and replaced it with a BMW M60. “Sourced from a ’95 BMW 740, the 4.0L overhead-cam V8 pushes out right at around 300 horsepower and 300 lb-ft of torque —an absolute ton in a car that weighs 1500 pounds.”

The oddity of a BMW engine in a hot-rod like this doesn’t elude Burroughs. “There are two dozen reasons why people will be quick to scoff at my choice of engine…I can’t help but smile as I’ve brought two things I love—two things that truly inspire me —together in my first ground-up build.”

Be sure to read Burroughs full write up on the process of the build. It’s a lengthy but fascinating read with a ton of pictures. And be sure to check out the video embedded in that article of Burroughs putting this truck rod through its paces.

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