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2008 Con-Expo-Con/Agg: Showtime

Posted By Equipment World Staff On May 3, 2008 @ 8:30 pm In In the Magazine | No Comments

The numbers were quite frankly above everyone’s expectations: more than 144,600 attendees, and 2.28 million net square feet of exhibits taken by 2,182 exhibitors – all in all a show that was 21 percent bigger than the last ConExpo-Con/Agg, held in 2005. Contractors seemed to take the media’s dire economic news with a grain of salt and showed up in droves. They were rewarded with an electrified atmosphere, a solid look at just-around-the-corner technology, plus the skinny on products already in production.

Up to 20 percent less fuel use with electric-drive D7E
Cat’s D7E boasts the first dozer-specific electric drive and an industry-exclusive single post cab. With more than 100 patents, the D7E is “innovative from the inside out,” says David Nicoll, Cat’s commercial manager for track-type tractors. The net effect for users, according to the company:

  • 10 percent more material moved per hour

  • 25 percent more material moved per gallon of fuel
  • Up to 20 percent less fuel consumption

How does the D7E electric drive work? In the D7E power train, the diesel engine drives a generator to produce electricity that ultimately powers two AC electric drive motors, which are connected to a differential steering system. A traditional mechanical transmission is not needed, because the variable speed electric motors serve the function of a continuously variable transmission. The electric drive train has 60 percent fewer moving parts compared to previous D7s. The electric system also provides power to auxiliary components so that no engine belts are needed. And cables have replaced the hard drive shaft.

By comparison, in the D7R – which the D7E will eventually replace – engine power goes through a torque divider and a powershift transmission.

Cat says the electric drive – with its sealed, liquid-cooled components – works in all environments. Eliminated are what the company calls “nuisance items”: engine belts, alternators and electric water pumps.

All potential line-of-sight barriers such as the exhaust, precleaner, single lift cylinder and an optional center-mounted AccuGrade post now line up with the cab center post, creating 35 percent more visibility in the cab.

The D7E is in the 60,000-pound weight range and is powered by a Cat C9 engine producing 235 horsepower. Cat will introduce the D7E in select markets during 2009.

High-speed quad-tracked dozer creates new silhouette
John Deere is taking the speed of a grader and the flotation of a crawler dozer and combining them to create the new Deere 764 HSD high-speed dozer, the first new construction machine form seen in the industry in years.

“The 764 HSD has the potential to revolutionize site preparation and road building with its speed alone,” said Dan Drescher, Deere’s product marketing manager for crawler dozers and crawler loaders.

The 764 HSD is powered by a 200-horsepower John Deere PowerTech 6.8-liter engine with a hydrostatic drive train. The new rubber-tracked dozer’s speeds can be infinitely controlled from 0 to 18 mph, with four ranges available at the touch of a button. The dozer will travel 18 mph across a jobsite without damaging pavement or requiring mats.

Operators can finish grade with the 764 HSD at about double the speed of similar sized crawler dozers. The 24-inch wide, independently suspended rubber tracks provide almost 5,000 square inches of track-on-the-ground for greater flotation and have much lower rolling resistance than conventional steel tracks. When the 764 HSD articulates, the dozer’s inside and outside track speeds automatically adjust for greater maneuverability. The 764 HSD’s max life undercarriage is designed as a complete unit and is backed by a 3,000-hour wear assurance program.

The fore-mounted cab is close to the 12-foot, six-way dozer blade and moves with it as the machine turns, providing a full view of the blade at all times for optimum control.

The 764 HSD uses familiar Deere controls. Two hydraulic circuits and a rear hitch let the dozer pull attachments like scrapers, discs, box blades and compactors for added versatility. Deere also offers an integrated grade control configuration on the new 764 dozer, with factory installed hardware, software and wiring that will support your choice of electronic grade control systems.

Hybrid wheel loader slated for late 2009 production
Volvo Construction Equipment says it will start producing a hybrid electric/engine L220F wheel loader next year, a machine it promotes as offering more power, better performance and a 10 percent reduction in fuel consumption. Developed on the Volvo D12 engine platform, the heart of the hybrid’s inner workings is an Integrated Starter Generator. Fitted between the engine and the transmission, the ISG is coupled to a lithium-ion battery that has significantly more power capacity than a normal lead-acid battery.

“HybriPower uses both electric and engine power in the best combination,” says Arvid Rinaldo, manager, global market communication, hauler and loader business line. Since the ISG allows the engine to be turned off when stationary, it combats engine idling, which Volvo says can take up to 40 percent of a wheel loader’s time. When you need power, though, the engine restarts by rapidly spinning up to optimum working speed using a burst of energy from the battery.

The ISG also overcomes the traditional engine problem of low torque at low engine speeds by automatically offering a massive electric torque boost, giving up to 50 kilowatts of instant mechanical energy.

The jobsite upshot? The engine will be off during long periods when it would otherwise be idling, and you don’t need to over-rev the engine in order to get sufficient torque to work. Since the ISG acts as a dynamo/alternator, the battery is replenished automatically without reducing productivity.

In addition, the loader’s climate control system is electrically powered instead of drawing power from the engine.

Volvo expects the L220F Hybrid will be the industry’s first commercially available loader when deliveries begin in late 2009. “It will spearhead a sea of change in the industry, highlighting to customers that buying a hybrid offers much more than just environmental benefits,” says the company.

World’s largest hydrostatically powered wheel loader uses 25 percent less fuel
Liebherr says their new L586 2+2 wheel loader consumes up to 25 percent less fuel than conventional drive machines and increases tire and brake life for more cost savings. The 340-horsepower at 1,800-rpm Liebherr engine powers the loader. The significant reduction in horsepower required to operate the L586 is directly attributed to the advanced hydrostatic drive system. The L586’s lower horsepower requires less fuel and still provides a tipping load of 45,040 pounds. The L586 cab features standard air conditioning and fully adjustable single lever joystick control, with an option of 2-in-1 steering and joystick steering.

Precise placement system for telehandlers
Machine operators can place loads precisely with fewer adjustments using JLG’s AccuPlace with Ride Control, a distributed hydraulics system that provides linear boom motion and a boom suspension system through an arrangement of hydraulic hoses that creates a single loop in place of the valve bank used to disperse oil in traditional hydraulic systems.

When engaged, the system eliminates the lift arc created when you raise the boom, and creates a linear movement. Instead of having the telehandler’s attachment over the cab, it lifts straight up vertically. When extending the boom, the AccuPlace system enables perfectly horizontal movement. The distributed hydraulics system offers several advantages:

  • 12 percent faster boom speeds

  • 27 percent reduction in leak points
  • 25 percent increase in hydraulic flow
  • Reduced bounce and stable load transfer

The AccuPlace system is available for JLG’s 55-foot telehandlers.

Integrated air intake to exhaust aftertreatment
Cummins’ 16-liter QSX engine will be available with a fully integrated air intake to exhaust aftertreatment system, designed to meet EPA Tier 4 interim emission regulations. And the engine now has an unrestricted top rating of 650 horsepower, compared to 600 horsepower of the current Tier 3 QSX, plus equal or higher torque and up to 5 percent more fuel efficiency. The Cummins particulate filter exhaust aftertreatment reduces particulate matter emissions by 90 percent; the company’s cooled exhaust gas recirculation reduces oxides of nitrogen by 45 percent. The engine also features a Cummins crankcase filter to eliminate blowby gas emissions.

7.6-cubic-yard wheel loader takes on aggregate, road markets
Featuring an electronically controlled, six-cylinder 320-horsepower Cummins engine, the Case Construction Equipment 1221E wheel loader has an operating weight of 30 metric tons. With a standard payload capacity of 7.6 cubic yards, the machine comes in Z-bar and XR linkage configurations. The isolation-mounted cab has an operator sound level of 72 decibels, with floor-to-ceiling glass in the front. A digital display records real-time data, showing diagnostic information and allowing programming of operational modes.

Doosan rolls out DX 225 and DX 255 excavators
The DX 225 and DX 255 excavators from Doosan Infracore have an electronics package that allows communication between the engine and hydraulics, a boom overload warning device and dual-walled exhaust silencer to reduce noise levels. An auxiliary valve with one-way and two-way hydraulic piping to the end of arm enables smooth attachment flow control. With an operating weight of 48,721 pounds, the DX 225 (pictured) has a maximum dig depth of 21 feet 9 inches and a bucket digging force of 33,510 pounds.

Komatsu adds D39EX-22 and D39PX-22 to hydrostatic dozer fleet
Equipped with hydrostatic transmissions, Komatsu’s D39EX-22 and D39PX-22 attack general construction, site preparation, forestry and utility jobs. Featuring a super-slant nose coupled with a cab-forward design, the machines place the operator closer to the blade while improving machine stability, ride and balance. The models push with a net horsepower of 105 horsepower at 2,400 rpm and range in operating weight from 20,834 to 21,804 pounds, depending on whether a machine is EX (standard version) or PX (low ground pressure version). The dozers use a power angle tilt blade with a capacity of 2.89 to 3.01 cubic yards.

Four-point track system allows anytime work
Genie’s S-60 and S-65 Trax telescopic boom models have a four-point track system permanently attached on the machine. The models’ narrower 8-foot 6-inch wide profile allow them to be easily transported without special oversize load permits. Since they steer like a wheel unit, operators can drive these machines on and off a delivery trailer, as well as maneuver in close proximity to walls and foundations.

Improve compaction performance with compactor’s scraper bar system
BOMAG has combined features from the company’s single drum rollers and refuse compactors in the BC462EB soil compactor, which features four-wheel hydrostatic drive and a 255-horsepower water-cooled Deutz diesel engine. The compactor has a sealed frame design to keep jobsite materials from entering the frame or engine compartment while providing complete protection to the drive train components, says the company. The compactor also features a scraper bar system designed to keep the wheels free of dirt to improve compaction performance. The BC462EB achieves compaction through sheer weight (51,000 pounds), the wheel design and the impact force of the teeth.

Up to 20 percent less fuel use with electric-drive D7E
Cat’s D7E boasts the first dozer-specific electric drive and an industry-exclusive single post cab. With more than 100 patents, the D7E is “innovative from the inside out,” says David Nicoll, Cat’s commercial manager for track-type tractors. The net effect for users, according to the company:

  • 10 percent more material moved per hour

  • 25 percent more material moved per gallon of fuel
  • Up to 20 percent less fuel consumption

How does the D7E electric drive work? In the D7E power train, the diesel engine drives a generator to produce electricity that ultimately powers two AC electric drive motors, which are connected to a differential steering system. A traditional mechanical transmission is not needed, because the variable speed electric motors serve the function of a continuously variable transmission. The electric drive train has 60 percent fewer moving parts compared to previous D7s. The electric system also provides power to auxiliary components so that no engine belts are needed. And cables have replaced the hard drive shaft.

By comparison, in the D7R – which the D7E will eventually replace – engine power goes through a torque divider and a powershift transmission.

Cat says the electric drive – with its sealed, liquid-cooled components – works in all environments. Eliminated are what the company calls “nuisance items”: engine belts, alternators and electric water pumps.

All potential line-of-sight barriers such as the exhaust, precleaner, single lift cylinder and an optional center-mounted AccuGrade post now line up with the cab center post, creating 35 percent more visibility in the cab.

The D7E is in the 60,000-pound weight range and is powered by a Cat C9 engine producing 235 horsepower. Cat will introduce the D7E in select markets during 2009.

High-speed quad-tracked dozer creates new silhouette
John Deere is taking the speed of a grader and the flotation of a crawler dozer and combining them to create the new Deere 764 HSD high-speed dozer, the first new construction machine form seen in the industry in years.

“The 764 HSD has the potential to revolutionize site preparation and road building with its speed alone,” said Dan Drescher, Deere’s product marketing manager for crawler dozers and crawler loaders.

The 764 HSD is powered by a 200-horsepower John Deere PowerTech 6.8-liter engine with a hydrostatic drive train. The new rubber-tracked dozer’s speeds can be infinitely controlled from 0 to 18 mph, with four ranges available at the touch of a button. The dozer will travel 18 mph across a jobsite without damaging pavement or requiring mats.

Operators can finish grade with the 764 HSD at about double the speed of similar sized crawler dozers. The 24-inch wide, independently suspended rubber tracks provide almost 5,000 square inches of track-on-the-ground for greater flotation and have much lower rolling resistance than conventional steel tracks. When the 764 HSD articulates, the dozer’s inside and outside track speeds automatically adjust for greater maneuverability. The 764 HSD’s max life undercarriage is designed as a complete unit and is backed by a 3,000-hour wear assurance program.

The fore-mounted cab is close to the 12-foot, six-way dozer blade and moves with it as the machine turns, providing a full view of the blade at all times for optimum control.

The 764 HSD uses familiar Deere controls. Two hydraulic circuits and a rear hitch let the dozer pull attachments like scrapers, discs, box blades and compactors for added versatility. Deere also offers an integrated grade control configuration on the new 764 dozer, with factory installed hardware, software and wiring that will support your choice of electronic grade control systems.

Hybrid wheel loader slated for late 2009 production
Volvo Construction Equipment says it will start producing a hybrid electric/engine L220F wheel loader next year, a machine it promotes as offering more power, better performance and a 10 percent reduction in fuel consumption. Developed on the Volvo D12 engine platform, the heart of the hybrid’s inner workings is an Integrated Starter Generator. Fitted between the engine and the transmission, the ISG is coupled to a lithium-ion battery that has significantly more power capacity than a normal lead-acid battery.

“HybriPower uses both electric and engine power in the best combination,” says Arvid Rinaldo, manager, global market communication, hauler and loader business line. Since the ISG allows the engine to be turned off when stationary, it combats engine idling, which Volvo says can take up to 40 percent of a wheel loader’s time. When you need power, though, the engine restarts by rapidly spinning up to optimum working speed using a burst of energy from the battery.

The ISG also overcomes the traditional engine problem of low torque at low engine speeds by automatically offering a massive electric torque boost, giving up to 50 kilowatts of instant mechanical energy.

The jobsite upshot? The engine will be off during long periods when it would otherwise be idling, and you don’t need to over-rev the engine in order to get sufficient torque to work. Since the ISG acts as a dynamo/alternator, the battery is replenished automatically without reducing productivity.

In addition, the loader’s climate control system is electrically powered instead of drawing power from the engine.

Volvo expects the L220F Hybrid will be the industry’s first commercially available loader when deliveries begin in late 2009. “It will spearhead a sea of change in the industry, highlighting to customers that buying a hybrid offers much more than just environmental benefits,” says the company.

World’s largest hydrostatically powered wheel loader uses 25 percent less fuel
Liebherr says their new L586 2+2 wheel loader consumes up to 25 percent less fuel than conventional drive machines and increases tire and brake life for more cost savings. The 340-horsepower at 1,800-rpm Liebherr engine powers the loader. The significant reduction in horsepower required to operate the L586 is directly attributed to the advanced hydrostatic drive system. The L586’s lower horsepower requires less fuel and still provides a tipping load of 45,040 pounds. The L586 cab features standard air conditioning and fully adjustable single lever joystick control, with an option of 2-in-1 steering and joystick steering.

Precise placement system for telehandlers
Machine operators can place loads precisely with fewer adjustments using JLG’s AccuPlace with Ride Control, a distributed hydraulics system that provides linear boom motion and a boom suspension system through an arrangement of hydraulic hoses that creates a single loop in place of the valve bank used to disperse oil in traditional hydraulic systems.
When engaged, the system eliminates the lift arc created when you raise the boom, and creates a linear movement. Instead of having the telehandler’s attachment over the cab, it lifts straight up vertically. When extending the boom, the AccuPlace system enables perfectly horizontal movement. The distributed hydraulics system offers several advantages:

  • 12 percent faster boom speeds

  • 27 percent reduction in leak points
  • 25 percent increase in hydraulic flow
  • Reduced bounce and stable load transfer

The AccuPlace system is available for JLG’s 55-foot telehandlers.

Kohler goes diesel
Long noted for their gasoline-powered engines, Kohler has introduced a family of diesel engines. The lineup includes seven air-cooled models from 6.7 to 34.4 horsepower and six liquid-cooled engines from 16.8 to 64.4 horsepower. Built for non-highway use, the new Kohler diesels have advanced fuel efficiency, low sound levels, and a wide range of air intake and oil filtration options, the company says.

RedLine knits GNSS to survey and office
The Leica Total GPS system taps into signals from both total stations and GNSS (GPS) systems to eliminate interruptions due to obstacles and offers a range of accuracy settings from rough grading to finish work. The company’s RedLine system streamlines workflows by synchronizing information coming from the office, base station set-up, data capturing devices and surveying as well as machine control and final as-built verifications.

Compact Power adds Boxer compact loader to product lineup
Compact Power’s 700 Series, which includes the 726DT, 732DT and the 749DT Boxer compact loaders, has hydrostatic transmissions, four-wheel drive for added traction and frame articulation and low ground pressure to minimize ground damage. Designed with a telescopic arm, the hinge pin height of the 726DT can reach more than 8 feet, the 732DT more than 9 feet and the 749DT more than 12 feet, letting you easily load dump trucks. The loader accepts more than 30 quick attachments.

Up to 20 percent less fuel use with electric-drive D7E
Cat’s D7E boasts the first dozer-specific electric drive and an industry-exclusive single post cab. With more than 100 patents, the D7E is “innovative from the inside out,” says David Nicoll, Cat’s commercial manager for track-type tractors. The net effect for users, according to the company:

  • 10 percent more material moved per hour

  • 25 percent more material moved per gallon of fuel
  • Up to 20 percent less fuel consumption

How does the D7E electric drive work? In the D7E power train, the diesel engine drives a generator to produce electricity that ultimately powers two AC electric drive motors, which are connected to a differential steering system. A traditional mechanical transmission is not needed, because the variable speed electric motors serve the function of a continuously variable transmission. The electric drive train has 60 percent fewer moving parts compared to previous D7s. The electric system also provides power to auxiliary components so that no engine belts are needed. And cables have replaced the hard drive shaft.

By comparison, in the D7R – which the D7E will eventually replace – engine power goes through a torque divider and a powershift transmission.

Cat says the electric drive – with its sealed, liquid-cooled components – works in all environments. Eliminated are what the company calls “nuisance items”: engine belts, alternators and electric water pumps.

All potential line-of-sight barriers such as the exhaust, precleaner, single lift cylinder and an optional center-mounted AccuGrade post now line up with the cab center post, creating 35 percent more visibility in the cab.

The D7E is in the 60,000-pound weight range and is powered by a Cat C9 engine producing 235 horsepower. Cat will introduce the D7E in select markets during 2009.

High-speed quad-tracked dozer creates new silhouette
John Deere is taking the speed of a grader and the flotation of a crawler dozer and combining them to create the new Deere 764 HSD high-speed dozer, the first new construction machine form seen in the industry in years.

“The 764 HSD has the potential to revolutionize site preparation and road building with its speed alone,” said Dan Drescher, Deere’s product marketing manager for crawler dozers and crawler loaders.

The 764 HSD is powered by a 200-horsepower John Deere PowerTech 6.8-liter engine with a hydrostatic drive train. The new rubber-tracked dozer’s speeds can be infinitely controlled from 0 to 18 mph, with four ranges available at the touch of a button. The dozer will travel 18 mph across a jobsite without damaging pavement or requiring mats.

Operators can finish grade with the 764 HSD at about double the speed of similar sized crawler dozers. The 24-inch wide, independently suspended rubber tracks provide almost 5,000 square inches of track-on-the-ground for greater flotation and have much lower rolling resistance than conventional steel tracks. When the 764 HSD articulates, the dozer’s inside and outside track speeds automatically adjust for greater maneuverability. The 764 HSD’s max life undercarriage is designed as a complete unit and is backed by a 3,000-hour wear assurance program.

The fore-mounted cab is close to the 12-foot, six-way dozer blade and moves with it as the machine turns, providing a full view of the blade at all times for optimum control.

The 764 HSD uses familiar Deere controls. Two hydraulic circuits and a rear hitch let the dozer pull attachments like scrapers, discs, box blades and compactors for added versatility. Deere also offers an integrated grade control configuration on the new 764 dozer, with factory installed hardware, software and wiring that will support your choice of electronic grade control systems.

Hybrid wheel loader slated for late 2009 production
Volvo Construction Equipment says it will start producing a hybrid electric/engine L220F wheel loader next year, a machine it promotes as offering more power, better performance and a 10 percent reduction in fuel consumption. Developed on the Volvo D12 engine platform, the heart of the hybrid’s inner workings is an Integrated Starter Generator. Fitted between the engine and the transmission, the ISG is coupled to a lithium-ion battery that has significantly more power capacity than a normal lead-acid battery.

“HybriPower uses both electric and engine power in the best combination,” says Arvid Rinaldo, manager, global market communication, hauler and loader business line. Since the ISG allows the engine to be turned off when stationary, it combats engine idling, which Volvo says can take up to 40 percent of a wheel loader’s time. When you need power, though, the engine restarts by rapidly spinning up to optimum working speed using a burst of energy from the battery.

The ISG also overcomes the traditional engine problem of low torque at low engine speeds by automatically offering a massive electric torque boost, giving up to 50 kilowatts of instant mechanical energy.

The jobsite upshot? The engine will be off during long periods when it would otherwise be idling, and you don’t need to over-rev the engine in order to get sufficient torque to work. Since the ISG acts as a dynamo/alternator, the battery is replenished automatically without reducing productivity.

In addition, the loader’s climate control system is electrically powered instead of drawing power from the engine.

Volvo expects the L220F Hybrid will be the industry’s first commercially available loader when deliveries begin in late 2009. “It will spearhead a sea of change in the industry, highlighting to customers that buying a hybrid offers much more than just environmental benefits,” says the company.

World’s largest hydrostatically powered wheel loader uses 25 percent less fuel
Liebherr says their new L586 2+2 wheel loader consumes up to 25 percent less fuel than conventional drive machines and increases tire and brake life for more cost savings. The 340-horsepower at 1,800-rpm Liebherr engine powers the loader. The significant reduction in horsepower required to operate the L586 is directly attributed to the advanced hydrostatic drive system. The L586’s lower horsepower requires less fuel and still provides a tipping load of 45,040 pounds. The L586 cab features standard air conditioning and fully adjustable single lever joystick control, with an option of 2-in-1 steering and joystick steering.

Precise placement system for telehandlers
Machine operators can place loads precisely with fewer adjustments using JLG’s AccuPlace with Ride Control, a distributed hydraulics system that provides linear boom motion and a boom suspension system through an arrangement of hydraulic hoses that creates a single loop in place of the valve bank used to disperse oil in traditional hydraulic systems.

When engaged, the system eliminates the lift arc created when you raise the boom, and creates a linear movement. Instead of having the telehandler’s attachment over the cab, it lifts straight up vertically. When extending the boom, the AccuPlace system enables perfectly horizontal movement. The distributed hydraulics system offers several advantages:

  • 12 percent faster boom speeds

  • 27 percent reduction in leak points
  • 25 percent increase in hydraulic flow
  • Reduced bounce and stable load transfer

The AccuPlace system is available for JLG’s 55-foot telehandlers.

3D system speeds up dozer operations
Topcon’s new 3D-MC2 machine control system doubles the speed and accuracy of GPS-based dozer systems by increasing ten-fold the system’s ability to calculate the positioning. In previous systems the GPS components could only make positioning calculations fast enough for a dozer with automated blade control to run in first gear. Run any faster and you risked creating a wavy surface. With the increase in processing speed a dozer can run in higher gear with no loss of accuracy.

Sakai launches compact roller line
Sakai America introduced four compact double drum steel and combination steel/pneumatic tire rollers. The new double drums, the SW320-1 and SW330-1, offer a high frequency of 4,000 vpm, which translates to higher operating speeds, while still maintaining the industry standard of 10 to 12 impacts per foot. The machines feature drum widths of 47 and 51 inches, respectively. The TW320-1 and TW330-1 have 47- and 51-inch vibratory drums on the front end for compaction and the kneading action of pneumatic tires on the rear for surface finishing.

IMT introduces European-style field service body
Targeted at customers who do not require a full-sized mechanics truck, Iowa Mold Tooling’s EDSC10 crane body and EDSS non-crane body models feature a European-style body mounted on a Dodge Sprinter chassis. The EDSC10, an 11-foot crane body, is rated for a 10,000-pound telescopic crane, and the EDSS non-crane body is available in 9- or 11-foot options. The size is designed to make the units useful in urban environments while addressing concerns about fuel economy.

Trimble’s web network puts everyone on the same page
From the office to the operators to the supervisors, all interested parties can work from the same sheet of music with Trimble’s Connected Community system. The system allows contractors to build information portals, share information and collaborate in real time. It combines GPS and wireless communications to create two-way data flows between site positioning systems, GPS machine control activities, and GPS asset tracking and maintenance/management systems. All this live information is sent to a website that can be accessed by office personnel, project owners, subcontractors, engineers and other designated project participants.

McNeilus unveils R-MOR for Revolution mixers
The McNeilus Revolution composite mixer drum now has R-MOR finish on the drum surface. The UV-resistant layer will not fade, and contains a white pigment so the drum does not need to be painted. In addition to the R-MOR finish, McNeilus has placed 2-inch channels throughout to spiral which allow water to flow behind the fin, preventing concrete buildup and improving mixing action. Revolution drums are 2,000 pounds lighter than steel drums and carry one-half yard of extra concrete.

Simplify hydraulic system troubleshooting with analyzer
Simultaneously measure a hydraulic system’s flow, pressure, temperature and power with the Racine Flow Meter Group’s Flo-tech Flo-Check USB Hydraulic System Analyzer, which can test, diagnose and troubleshoot any piece of hydraulic equipment. The system transmits data through a standard USB cable and displays the information through a Windows-based application. The Analyzer can be used as a stationary or portable tester, and can be set for continuous measurement, controlled start/stop measurement or up to 12 hours of continuous logging. All data is saved as a .csv, or comma-separated value file, making it simple to export into most spreadsheet programs.

Moxy unveils AB510 rigid dump truck
Moxy Trucks of America, known for its articulated dump truck lineup, has expanded into the small rigid-frame truck market with the AB510. Powered by a Cummins QSX15 diesel engine producing 600 horsepower at 2,100 rpms, the AB510 has a six-speed Allison H5600AR transmission. With a weight of 77.60 metric tons, the truck has a 46.2-metric-ton payload capacity. A two-cylinder, two-stage hoist system, fixed to the chassis, is powered by a pump directly mounted to the gearbox, giving a tipping time of less than 11 seconds to a maximum angle of 51 degrees.

RM100 crusher makes U.S. debut
Achieve a 220-ton-per-hour production rate with Rubble Master’s RM100 crusher, which processes concrete, bricks, asphalt and natural rock. The RM100 eliminates the need to transport construction and demolition waste to landfills, and creates a potential income source from the aggregate end product.

Doosan Infracore Portable Power offers mobile security system
Monitor jobsites by remote with Doosan Infracore Portable Power’s new Ingersoll Rand MVS-6 mobile security system. A self-contained power unit uses a standard hybrid power system – solar and diesel – for six months of uninterrupted remote operation. The 85-watt solar power array continuously charges three deep cycle batteries, and a diesel generator provides power to auxiliary outlets and standard lighting while charging the batteries during periods of limited sun exposure. The unit also includes a motion detector that initiates camera operation, and an operator can remotely control the pan, tilt and zoom functions of the camera.

Networkcar management system compatible with all vehicles
Managers can closely monitor every aspect of fleet operations with the Networkfleet 3500 wireless vehicle management system from Networkcar. Compatible with all vehicles – light, medium or heavy – the in-vehicle unit wirelessly transmits GPS location and engine diagnostics from the vehicle. The 3500 features an automotive grade exterior, positive retention connectors, tamper evident capability and a Siemens TC63 wireless module.

Eighty-ton excavator is largest Hyundai offering
Hyundai introduces the largest of their excavator line – the 80-ton R800LC-7A. A Cummins QSX Tier III engine powers the R800LC-7A, generating 460 net horsepower at 1,600 rpms. Electric powered functions such as engine speed, variable pump flow, boom priority function, power boost, auto and one touch deceleration functions, auto engine warm-up, engine overheat prevention, travel speed control, anti re-start function and self diagnostic features are all controlled by Hyundai’s CAPO computer system.

Lincoln Electric Ranger 250 GXT handles variety of welding applications
Perform multi-process welding with Lincoln Electric’s Ranger 250 GXT, an AC/DC welder with an AC auxiliary power generator. The Ranger has a 250-amp output for stick, TIG, MIG and flux-cored welding, and arc gouging with up to 3/16-inch carbons. The Ranger’s AC generator provides 11,000 watts of peak power and 10,000 watts of continuous power, and the KVA 120V/140V outlet enables the operator to run plasma cutters, inverters or a motor. Operators can also power several tools at a time with the Ranger’s four 120V outlets.

Gorman-Rupp introduces Tier 3 pump models
Gorman-Rupp has added three new priming assisted pump models to the company’s product line that use a Tier 3 compliant power unit. The new models – PA4C22-4045H, PA4C60-4045H and PA6C60-4045H – are coupled to the John Deere 4045HF285 air-cooled diesel engine, and each unit comes equipped with an integrated steel base/fuel tank. The models have a standard pump priming chamber and an auto-start/stop engine control with a detachable single float switch assembly.

Atlas Copco takes on the big jobs
Atlas Copco Construction Tools has unveiled their most powerful hydraulic breaker, the HB 10000, designed for heavy excavation and trenching projects, demolition of large concrete structures and primary rock breaking. The HB 10000 weighs 10 metric tons and delivers 50 percent more impact energy than the HB 7000, the company’s next largest model. Accepting hydraulic flow of 119 to 140 gallons per minute at operating pressures of 2,320 to 2,610 psi, the HB 10000 delivers an impact rate of up to 380 blows per minute and requires carriers in the 85- to 140-metric ton weight class.

Big mill easy to track and steer
Wirtgen’s W 150 large-but-compact milling machine accepts milling drums with 4-foot, 4-foot 3-inch and 5-foot working widths. Cutting depths range from 0 to 13 inches. The W 150 runs off a 350-horsepower Cummins engine. A four-fold, full-floating and height adjustment system comes standard to ensure that the machine aligns parallel to the road and maintains traction on its four crawler track units. A tapered waist design gives the operator a clear view of the milling edge for precise steering. The Wirtgen W 150 will replace the company’s W 1500 in the lineup.

Filter gives same performance in smaller size
With space at a premium in today’s emissions-regulated engines, Donaldson introduced its PowerCore G2 filtration technology. The new filters have a 30 percent smaller footprint and can provide what the company calls a “matrix” of performance advantages including the compact size, lower pressure drop and longer filter life or a combination of the three depending on customer requirements.

Heavy-duty grease stands up to worst case scenario
Chevron’s new Delo Heavy Duty EP grease is formulated for severe service conditions. Its tackifiers resist wash out from high pressure cleaning equipment as well as wet off-road environments. It’s designed to resist shock loads making it ideal for use in pins and bushings on buckets, loaders, shovels, shaker screens, crushers and conveyors. The new heavy-duty grease is compatible with existing Delo Grease EP and also comes in 3-percent and 5-percent moly versions and multiple grades including NLGI 1 for better pump-ability at low temperatures and NLGI 2 for normal temperatures.

Perkins focuses on mechanical control
As part of its commitment to keeping things simple, Perkins showcased its flagship 1104D-44TA mechanically controlled engine. This Tier 3 model has four cylinders and a power output of 117 horsepower. The turbocharged, air-to-air charge cooled 4.4-liter unit keeps the maximum torque figures of the Tier 2 version with 223 to 275 foot-pounds and offers an optional 85-horsepower SAE B PTO drive. The design incorporates many features to minimize installation costs including identical major hook-up points and reduced noise levels which obviate the need for a costly sound attenuation processes.

Cart keeps welders mobile on site
Most big welding machines have a lift hook for loading and unloading into trucks, but when it comes to moving one of these machines around a jobsite, mobility can be challenging. That’s why Miller Electric designed the All Purpose Running Gear for its Bobcat, Trailblazer and Miller Legend 302 welding generators. The combination of large rear tires and smaller front casters enables the cart to roll over both uneven terrain and small gravel and stone. You can also order the All Purpose Running Gear with optional flatproof tires and a protective cage.

Clean-sheet paver design enhances operator sight lines
The Vogele America Vision series of pavers include a 10-foot tracked Vision 5200-2, a 10-foot wheeled Vision 5203-2 and the 8-foot tracked Vision 5103-2. These clean-sheet designs offer lots of forward and all-around visibility with sloped hoods and sides. The operator stations swing out from both sides of the machine for views into the hopper as well as to the edges and behind the machine. Self diagnostics are built into the Vision Series, eliminating the need to check fluid levels and other inspection points every day.

New roller line offers multiple widths, vibration modes
Hamm’s compact asphalt roller line includes the HD 8 VV with a 31.5-inch drum; the HD 10 VV and HD 10 C VV, both with 39-inch drums; the 47-inch drum HD 12 VV; the HD 13 VV with a 51-inch drum; and the HD 14 VV with a 54-inch drum. VV stands for vibration front, vibration rear, and these machines can vibrate both drums together, front only or rear only, or turn the vibration off in both drums.

High-tech slurry seal/micro-surface paver improves accuracy on the go
The new M310 truck-mounted slurry seal and micro-surfacing paver from Bergkamp uses an electronic mix control and diagnostic system that displays current and average material ratios, total material used and material rates. It also produces on-demand reports to track production for individual sections of the job or the entire job using an onboard printer. The system ties material ratios of aggregate, asphalt emulsion, water, additive and fines together with an electronic signal and automatically maintains the ratios with feedback loops, making it easy to adjust during production without compromising the accuracy of the mix.

FPT diesel engine offers multiple configurations
Fiat Powertrain Technologies (previously Iveco Motors of North America) exhibited its new F32 engines, available in 74, 82 and 87 horsepower at 2,500 rpm. These four-cylinder, in-line engines hold 3.2 liters of displacement and feature two valves per cylinder, mechanical fuel injection, cast iron heads, turbochargers with or without aftercoolers, and external cooled or internal EGR versions. Front and side mounted PTOs are available and single-side service points reduce maintenance time.

Quick coupler maintains geometry, breakout force
Adaptable to any compact excavator from 1 to 10 metric tons, the Klac system mechanical quick coupler reduces the amount of time it takes to add and remove attachments. Pulling on a lever unlocks the Klac system and new attachments are locked into place without the need for a safety pin. The coupler maintains the original bucket-to-stick geometry so you don’t lose any breakout force.

Soil stabilizer offers 500,000-pound cutter torque rating
Roadtec’s 700-horsepower SX-7 soil stabilizer features a 21-inch cut depth, up to 500,000 pounds of torque supplied to the cutter, three-piece wheels for better tire grip and zero-turn steering. With its right hand flush cut, the machine pulverizes or stabilizes all the way to the curb line. The SX-7 cuts 8 feet 5 inches wide, making it easily capable of three passes on a 24-foot wide road. The cutter housing position can be adjusted on the fly to provide gradation and throughput for shallow cuts as well as for deep stabilization.

Large hydraulic truck crane available with optional fly attachments
Link-Belt’s HTC-3140LB 140-ton hydraulic truck crane has a 195.3-foot, six-section boom with a boom tip height of 204 feet. With five boom modes, the HTC-3140LB can telescope a load like a conventional full power boom. Teflon inserts in the wear pads eliminate boom grease. A 10-foot heavy lift fly attachment supplies more than 20 tons of capacity and lift procedures for two load lines. This fly, when integrated with the optional three piece, bi-fold lattice fly and three 18-foot extensions, allows the crane to reach 311 feet.

Device warns machine operators of excessive vibration
Grammer’s VibroControl vibration dosimeter detects excessive vibrations before they reach potentially dangerous levels. Attached to the driver’s seat, the 4.2-by-2.6-by-0.9-inch device continuously monitors vibrations for up to 12 hours when fully charged and warns when acceptable limits are exceeded. While working, the operator can tell by looking at the integrated trend LEDs whether the accumulated vibrations are nearing health-endangering limits.

Earth-measuring software incorporates machine control capabilities
Maxwell Systems’ earth-measuring software, Quest Earthwork 7.5, incorporates machine control capabilities with a cut-and-fill program. The software integrates directly with machine control systems by exporting data in the required file formats, including Trimble (TTM), Topcon (TN3) and new AutoCAD exports for triangulation, areas and contours. Once cut-and-fill quantities and proposed grades have been determined, the estimator can convert data to a format compatible for machine control. Any adjustments to data can be made with the machine control manufacturer’s software or AutoCAD.

Mobile generator quietly powers a variety of equipment on site
Shindaiwa’s kWiet Power Model DGK25C, a 20-kilowatt mobile generator powered by an Isuzu diesel engine, features Simul-Phase Technology for the simultaneous use of dual-voltage, single-phase and three-phase current. The DGK25C’s Simul-Phase Technology supplies 120- and 240-volt power for lights, air conditioners or electric tools, and three-phase 208-, 240- or 480-volt power for motors driving compressors or pumps.

Field tracking software provides real-time project information
Bid2Win Software’s Build2Win field tracking software uses baseline information transferred from Bid2Win Estimating and Bidding, and allows tracking of actual production quantities, labor hours, equipment usage, material quantities, subcontractor work and trucking against estimated values. Using a browser-based user interface, executives, project managers, field engineers and foremen can all view and track real-time status information about projects. Accounting personnel can also quickly and easily transfer actual quantities and payroll to an accounting system.

Hydraulically operated mixing attachment processes difficult materials
Effectively handle difficult materials like clay in different forms, peat, sludge, mud and contaminated soil with the Allu PM stabilization unit. The Power Mix mounts to an excavator converting it to a movable mixing plant. The drums move and mix material in three different directions, simultaneously, in a controlled way. The Power Mix can process materials to a depth of 16.4 feet, depending on the excavator’s reach and the material’s quality.

Deere develops engines for generator market
John Deere Power Systems announced three new engines for use in gen-set applications – the PowerTech E 9.0L and the PowerTech 9.0L and 13.5L. The PowerTech E 9.0L for the 60-Hz gen-set market features full-authority electronic controls, a fixed geometry turbocharger and a high-pressure common rail fuel injection system. These engines range from 279 to 384 horsepower and provide improved cold-start performance and precise engine speed control. The PowerTech 9.0L and 13.5L are designated for the 50-Hz gen-set market and deliver horsepower ranges from 308 to 367 and 443 to 556 respectively.

Extreme terrain tracks deliver traction in mud and snow
ASV, recently acquired by Terex, introduces their new extreme terrain tracks for the ASV PT-50 and PT-60 rubber track loaders and the ASV ST-50 tracked utility vehicle. The extreme terrain tracks give the machines traction and low ground pressure – as low as 3 psi, according to Brad Lemke, ASV product manager, on delicate landscape applications, soft and sticky cohesive ground conditions and snow removal applications, without leaving ground damage usually associated with regular skid steer loaders. The extreme rubber tracks have a deep tread pattern for traction in wet conditions and have wider spaces between the tread lugs for self-cleaning. They will also fit earlier ASV RC-50, RC-60 and Scout SC-50 models.

Wacker Neuson introduces 3.5-metric-ton compact excavators
Model 38Z3 is Wacker Neuson’s new 3.5-metric-ton machine with zero tail swing and tilting cab. The 36.8-horsepower Yanmar engine provides the excavator with a 10-foot 2-inch digging depth and is available with either a canopy or full cab. Air conditioning is standard on full cab versions.

Get faster cycle times with radial construction tires
Bridgestone Firestone’s radial construction 500/70R24 DuraForce RT 157 tire is designed for tractors, backhoes, telehandlers and rough terrain forklifts. The company says the radial construction provides more traction than bias tires, which results in faster cycle times, lower rolling resistance for better fuel economy and better wear. The Radial DuraForce RT has a load capacity of 9,100 pounds at 46 psi.

Kobelco TAKES ON 80-TO-90-METRIC-TON SIZE CLASS
Kobelco introduces its first 80-to 90-metric-ton class excavator to the American market with the SK850LC. The 88-metric-ton heavy-duty excavator delivers 90,148 pounds of breakout force, 27 percent more pounds of force than the next sized down Kobelco SK480 model. The 496-horsepower engine powers four working modes. H mode allows heavy digging and high productivity, while S mode delivers standard digging and increased fuel economy. B mode powers one-way flow attachments and A mode powers two-way flow attachments. The SK850 can be configured four different ways for transport, reducing the time, cost and number of trucks required to move it to a jobsite.

Articulating cranes deliver flexibility in tight spaces
Auto Crane’s new line of 18 articulating cranes allows for more flexibility in small spaces and offer a lift capacity ranging from 31,800 to 332,700 foot-pounds. The controls on each side of the crane are identical in their positioning to lessen operator confusion. High-tensile strength steel makes the crane lighter and more compact than a traditional steel version, and improves payload capacity of the truck carrying the crane. The cranes come standard with a full two-year warranty and suit mining, heavy construction, field service, railroad, propane, forestry and refuse applications.

Haulette debuts big boom telescopic handler
Haulette’s HB86 TJ+ 86-foot straight boom telescopic handler has a 75-foot-6-inch outreach; the telescopic jib reaches an additional 16 feet. The machine has a lift capacity of 722 pounds and a narrow 8-foot-1-inch fixed width frame. The platform is 8 feet high.

Simplify tooth replacement with Ultralok system
Esco’s Ultralok tooth system features an integral hammerless locking system for improved safety and simplified replacement. The system eliminates the need for separate pins or locks, and increases useable wear metal. Designed for 6- to 75-metric-ton excavtors and 3- to 12-cubic-yard wheel loaders, the Ultralock system comes in seven sizes for construction machines.

Compact excavator excels in tight spots
Bobcat introduced its new 418 excavator with pilot operated joystick controls and zero-tail swing to give you smooth, precise digging in the tightest spots. The undercarriage on this 2,593-pound machine retracts to 28 inches allowing you to slip through narrow gates and doorways, and you can fold down the Tip-Over Protective Structure (TOPS) to get under low hanging obstacles. The Bobcat 418 digs to 6 feet deep with a bucket breakout force of 1,865 pounds per foot. The boom cylinder is mounted on top to keep it away from damage. The 418 excavator replaces the Bobcat 316 in the model lineup.

Yanmar launches low profile wheel loader
Yanmar has introduced the V4-6 compact wheel loader, which features a lower profile than previous models. The 7,651-pound machine features a 40.4-horsepower, three-cylinder water cooled diesel TNV series engine that provides the V4-6 with an 11.8-mph travel speed. Lifting capacity is 7,451 pounds, and the loader features a fully automatic drive mode and fixed speed mode. The V4-6 has 12 inches of ground clearance for uneven surfaces on jobsites.

New off-road hauler concept features 40-ton capacity and 43-mph top speed
Western Star’s 6900 XD is an off-highway truck built to compete in specialized applications that until now contractors were turning to articulated dump trucks to fill. The 6900 XD features a top speed of 43 mph, reinforced Western Star cab with all the creature comforts found in the company’s on-highway models, 110,000-pound planetary drive axles, fully-automatic Allison 4500 RDS transmission and steel-reinforced, purpose-built dump box. Company officials say the 6900 XD excels in off-highway, heavy-haul applications with runs longer than 1 1⁄2 miles and well-graded haul roads.

Ten percent better visibility on JCB’s low boom Hi-Viz Loadall models
JCB increases the all-around visibility on their Loadall telescopic handler line with the addition of the Loadall 535-125 HiViz and 535-140 Hi-Viz models. The new Hi-Viz models offer 10 percent better visibility at the rear of the machine by reducing the boom pin pivot height by 9.5 inches. The new Loadalls have a more compact rear chassis with a minimal 3.5-inch overhang for greater maneuverability. Higher lock angles on the machines’ new axles improve the turning radius by 9 inches. Both models have a standard 85-horsepower JCB Dieselmax engine, with an option of a 100-horsepower engine.

Super high output construction lighting system
The new V-Series vertical light tower and SHO-HD lighting technology from Allmand Bros. will light up to 45 percent more surface areas compared to 1,000-watt fixtures. The SHO-HD system features 1,250-watt lamps and ballasts and produces 150,000 lumens per lamp – 36 percent more than standard 1,000-watt lamps. The system’s even light (no hotspots) has a color rendering index of 70 CRI and Kelvin color temperature of 3,954K which provides whiter light and truer colors allowing workers to recognize objects comfortably in night working environments.

Production style graders in a smaller package
Champion introduces the C110C tandem drive and C116C all wheel drive motor graders that are designed to bridge the gap between compact graders and full-size machines. The C110C and C116 C weigh 24,000 pounds and are powered by 133-horsepower Cummins QSB6.7 engines. The all-wheel-drive C116C lets the operator engage only the front wheels up to 2 mph for fine grading. The direct drive transmission (8 forward / 4 reverse) with a top speed of 27 mph will also let the C110C and C116C clear snow.

ZF Industries introduces dump truck transmission
Perform dumping operations quicker and more economically with ZF Industries’ Ergopower LII Hydrodynamic Powershift transmission. The 540-horsepower Ergopower LII is designed specifically for dump trucks with up to 50-ton payloads. Eight forward and four reverse gears increase the overall transmission ratio from 7 to 11 compared with previous models, enabling higher driving speeds while providing up to a 15-percent reduction in engine RPMs.

Complete assembly quickly with Kobelco’s crawler crane
Choose from three different configurations with Kobelco Cranes North America’s SL6000, a 600-ton crawler crane. The standard crane configuration features a 276-foot maximum standard main boom, 354-foot maximum long boom and a luffer option of a 197-foot main boom plus a 236-foot luffing jib. The crane’s heavy lift configuration includes an additional mast for a 217-foot main boom with a 236-foot luffing jib, and the super heavy lift crane includes a heavy lift mast and an additional 551,400 pounds of palette counterweight for a 413-foot maximum long boom.

Manitou debuts highest reach rough terrain telehandler
Manitou North America says it now offers the highest reach rough terrain telehandler. The Maniscopic MHT 10210 telescopic material handler rises to 31 feet 9 inches and has a lift capacity of 46,000 pounds. Designed for heavy lifting in mining and quarry applications, the Maniscopic MHT 10210 has a forward reach of 19 feet and is powered by a 175-horsepower Mercedes diesel engine.

Power for big wheel loaders
Designed as an optimized drivetrain for 33-ton front end loaders, this Dana drivetrain system includes a Spicer TE32 transmission, a Spicer Model 53R300 front axle and a Spicer Model 43R183 rear axle. The electronically controlled transmission is rated at 360 to 530 horsepower and comes as a three- or four-speed powershift version with helical gearing. The axles are equipped with internal, fade- and maintenance-free, liquid cooled brakes and limited-slip differentials.

When terrain changes, suspension reacts electronically
Parker’s new “tunable” piston hydraulic spring/shock absorber suspension design allows operators of heavy-duty mobile equipment to change suspension dynamics through an electronic interface. The suspension can be tuned to optimize rides in everything from hard pavement to soft sand and gravel.


Show Briefs
Volvo shows its true colors: After acquiring the Ingersoll Rand line of paving equipment in 2006, Volvo Construction Equipment rebranded and repainted the machines just in time for a ConExpo unveiling. The machines now sport the familiar Volvo badging and yellow and gray paint scheme, but the pavers still carry a small Blaw-Knox sticker to remind customers of the origins of this popular brand.

No SCR for Deere Tier 4: John Deere Power Systems announced that its engines will be relying on diesel oxidation catalysts and particulate filters to meet the requirements of Interim Tier 4 emissions standards with no need for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology. In addition to the DOC and DPF after-treatments, Deere’s PowerTech Plus line of engines will increase the percentage of cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for NOx control. The company also announced at the show that it has partnered with Liebherr to service JDPS engines in more than 150 locations throughout Europe. Deere provides engines for Liebherr’s compact loaders, crawler loaders and telehandlers sold in Europe.

Standard rear cameras: Caterpillar will make a rear camera standard this September on its 740 articulated trucks and Komatsu now has a standard rear camera on its excavators.

Compact Komtrax: Komatsu is now putting its Komtrax machine management system on its compact equipment.

King of the rodeo: Nick Market of Windsor, Ontario, an equipment operator with Sherqy Contracting, came out on top of a field of 42,000 backhoe operators to become the new Case Rodeo Series North American Champion. Market, who has been operating backhoes for nearly 30 years, received a 50th anniversary limited-edition Case 580 Super M Series 2 backhoe, valued at nearly $120,000.

Sustainable development: The Portland Cement Association’s 2008 Sustainable Development Survey indicates at least three of every four respondents used concrete as a design component for such projects in the past year.

Inflation alert: Diesel, copper and steel – as well as labor costs – are expected to rise this year, according to the Associated General Contractors of America’s 2008 Construction Inflation Alert, compiled by AGC’s chief economist, Ken Simonson. Nonresidential construction will shift from last year’s “nearly universal expansion” to more selective growth in segments such as power and energy, communication, hospital and higher education. Simonson predicts a 4 to 8 percent increase in nonresidential spending – compared to a 16 percent hike in 2007 – and a 15 to 20 percent drop in residential spending, versus an 18 percent drop in 2007.

Future Artic: Volvo unveiled its futuristic look at the articulated truck, christening it the Centaur. With the Centaur, operators will no longer have to climb ladders to get to the cab – the cab will kneel down to ground level instead. And hydraulics contain water, not oil.

Aggressive growth plans: JCB intends to build on the momentum of last year’s 18 percent sales growth in the U.S. market with plans to increase the number of JCB dealers in North America from the current 130 to 250 dealers, with 500 locations, within the next three years.

Appraisal services: IronPlanet now offers appraisal services for equipment buyers and sellers, financial institutions, leasing companies, attorneys, tax advisors and insurance brokers. The service, which uses IronPlanet’s proprietary equipment database, is intended to assist clients in the purchase and sale of equipment, bankruptcy issues, insuring equipment and for tax purposes.

Operator exams via computer: The National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators now offers certification exams via computer. LaserGrade, a provider of assessment solutions, will provide the computer testing services. Initially, the computer-based testing will focus on mobile crane certification and be available in California only. Recertification exams will also be offered.

Acquisitions coming: Wacker Neuson is targeting demolition and asphalt applications and anticipates future growth with acquisitions of complementary companies.

Off-road tire plant: Bridgestone Firestone North American Tire is investing at least $12 million over the next fire years in its Bloomington, Illinois, off-road tire plant, which will allow the company to produce new off-road tire sizes.

Blog away: Foundation Software has launched a construction business blog, called “Construction Business News and Views by Fred,” which will be updated monthly by the company’s CEO and chairman, Fred Ode. The blog will feature interviews with construction industry experts, as well as posts on industry trends. For more information, visit foundationsoft.blogspot.com/ [1] or www.foundationsoft.com [2].

Anniversaries: Milwaukee-based engine manufacturer Briggs & Stratton, which started with engine-powered bicycles and novelties such as the electric-hybrid automobile prototype, is celebrating its 100th year in business. Globally, the company has more than 8,000 employees and 10 manufacturing facilities. It’s the 70th year for Allmand Bros., Holdrege, Nebraska, which makes portable light towers, compact backhoes, jobsite heaters and arrowboards.

Cat pull-type scrapers: Caterpillar has bought E-Ject Systems, Elkader, Iowa, giving it an entrée into the pull-type scraper market. E-Ject’s 40,000-square-foot facility will be known as Caterpillar Elkader. The plant also makes E-Ject Wagons, construction discs and a towed sheeps-foot roller.

Affordable machine control: Magellan Navigation (formerly Ashtec) will release an economical machine control package late this year or in early 2009. Customers, says Dr. Robert Snow of Magellan, will be able to take the system out of the box and use the machine right away. It can be used for something as simple as a guidance computer screen up to a fully guided system.

Back in off-highway: ArvinMeritor has re-established its off-highway OEM and aftermarket components business in North and South America, Europe and Asia beginning immediately. Although the company has significantly reduced its profile in those markets over the past decade, it has remained a major off-highway player in Asian and Pacific markets. Two products mark ArvinMeritor’s re-entry: The MOA20DKO 20-metric-ton wheel loader axle and a global family of single and tandem hub reduction axles for heavy-haul construction trucks as well as a host of suspension systems and brake products. Company officials hint that more off-highway offerings will be announced in the near future.


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